Fly Fishing Water Levels in Park City - end of August 2014

Fly Fishing Water Levels in Park City – end of August 2014

Fall Fishing is Almost Here

As summer winds down, the fishing pressure decreases on many streams, lakes, and rivers in Utah. Browns and brook trout are pre-spawn feeding which makes them very catchable.

A fly fisherman fishes near a bridge

Recently, Park City has been fortunate to get some much needed rain in what is typically the second driest state in the nation. The rain has helped cool off high mountain streams and has added some flow, but also makes hatches a little harder to predict. The wind and accompanying precipitation has also made the conditions of these streams more variable. Water levels are fluctuating daily and mud washing into the rivers is changing the color of the water.

Fly fishing has still been great, so grab some rain gear and new flies and head into the mountains to catch some gorgeous late summer trout.

“With nighttime temperatures cooling off, I start using smaller terrestrial flies such as ants, small hoppers and cicadas.”

Current water levels for the Provo, Weber, North and South Slope Uinta Streams:

  • Provo River near Woodland: 249 cubic feet per second (cfs)
  • Provo River Middle section: 404 cfs release
  • Provo River Lower: 206 cfs
  • Weber River near Oakley, UT: 181 cfs
  • Weber River near Coalville, UT: 234 cfs
  • Weber River near Echo, UT: 337 cfs
  • Bear River (North Slope HWY 150): 235 cfs
  • Blacks Fork (North Slope): 217 cfs
  • Duchesne near Tabiona/Hannah: 109 cfs
  • Rock Creek near Duchesne confluence: 53 cfs

How to Improve Late Summer Fly Fishing – Terrestrial Patterns and Riffles

In streams and rivers where fish have been pressured, be sure to cast to small pockets in the riffles and undercuts. Throw flies in areas that most people tend to not even notice and find out-of-the-way spots that require a little more walking.

With nighttime temperatures cooling off, I start using smaller terrestrial flies such as ants, small hoppers and cicadas. In streams with deeper pools, a bead dropper or a pine squirrel streamer are good bets to test the bend of your rod.

A fisherman fishes in a green forest

The high Uinta streams are still fishing very well with small dries and provide a welcome respite from the bigger, heavily fished waters. These streams tend to have an abundance of wary fish so be stealthy, wear a buff and keep your clothing neutral in color. At times I will crawl to the bank just to keep my profile low, without risking alerting the fish. Also, when venturing into the headwaters of your favorite rivers, reduce stressing the trout by fighting them quickly and taking time to revive them well before release.

Hope to see you on the water,

Travis Jay Vernon, Fly Fishing Guide & Sales Associate

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